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Richard Parkes Bonington: Oct. 22, 2018 - Dec. 18, 2018

Richard Parkes Bonington: Oct. 22, 2018 - Dec. 18, 2018

10/22/2018

Richard Parkes Bonington is the first major exhibition in New York to be devoted to the work of the British romantic master Richard Parkes Bonington.  

Max Beckmann from Private Collections,  May 1-June 22, 2018

Max Beckmann from Private Collections, May 1-June 22, 2018

New York Times: What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

06/15/2018

Max Beckmann

Through June 22. Richard L. Feigen, 16 East 77th Street, Manhattan; 212-628-0700, rlfeigen.com.

With figurative painting ascendant, exhibitions of the great German painter Max Beckmann (1884-1950), are always inspiring; especially those that include rarely exhibited or reproduced works. Such is the case with “Max Beckmann: From Private Collections” at Richard L. Feigen, a selection of 18 paintings and drawings that celebrates the gallery’s relocation and its new partnership with the longtime private dealer Puppa Sayn-Wittgenstein Nottebohm.

View nytimes.com

Suffering of the Body

Suffering of the Body

by Paul Jeromack

Nov. 4, 2011-Jan. 27, 2012

New York in late January is a veritable marathon of Old Masters, from the big auctions at Christie's and Sotheby’s to smaller dealer shows. Especially notable is the exhibition of 22 late-15th-century panel paintings from Northern Europe and especially Germany -- made outside of the better-known centers in Italy and the Netherlands -- presented at Richard L. Feigen & Co. on East 69th Street by Sam Fogg, a leading London dealer of medieval manuscripts.

The Mystery of the British Landscape Master

The Mystery of the British Landscape Master

by Souren Melikian

June 5, 2010

The case of the minor 18th-century portraitist who became the first major English landscape painter and revolutionized the approach of European masters to nature is one of those mysteries at the heart of art history that may never be explained.

Gallery Chronicle

Gallery Chronicle

by James Panero

January 2005

Several years ago, at a panel of art academics, I witnessed an eye-opening event. Behind an array of dons were projected the images of two Picasso paintings—one, an abstract arrangement of colored shapes, the other, a figure. After a surfeit of deliberations on the circumstances of production, theories of sexuality, and the artist’s “gaze,” a student from the audience stood to make an observation.

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